Aurora, Sonata No. 1 for Violoncello
  • Aurora, Sonata No. 1 for Violoncello

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$15.00

Impressionism. That is the name given to the style of wonderful artists as Claude Monet, Édouard Manet, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, and Berthe Morisot and composers as Claude Debussy, Maurice Ravel, and Erik Satie. Monet’s painting “Impression, Sunrise” would give the name to this movement. Debussy and Ravel hated this term, while Satie preferred Dadaism; however, it has been analogous with their music for over a century. These composers have been a major influence in my compositional life. Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun and Deux Arabesques have stuck with me since hearing them. Satie’s Gymnopedie harmonic texture makes me smile every time I hear it. It’s rhythmically not challenging, but yet such an inspiring composition. Around my senior year in college, I went to the University of Michigan University Symphony Orchestra concert of Ravel’s Daphnis et Chloe Suite 2. This was the first time I heard an orchestra piece by Ravel. I was mesmerized. The trade of the flutes and clarinets in the beginning with the violas and cellos underneath was one of the most beautiful sounds I had ever heard. I immediately went to the classical music store right off campus and bought Pierre Boulez’s recording of

Claude Monet’s “Impression, Sunrise” Daphnis et Chloe. Let’s just say I’ve bought it three times since! My best friend Dr. Earl Brooks and I drove from Denver/Aurora to Aspen. This route on I-70 has to be one of the most beautiful drives in the country. The water from the mountains, the mountains, the ski resorts, the trees, the sunrise/sunset, and the landscape were just breathtaking. It stayed this awesome for the entire three hours. I parallel the painting “Impression, Sunrise” with the word “Aurora.” Aurora means “Dawn” which coincidently is also the sunrise. There are some points in Aurora that are unbelievable, although all of what I have seen in Colorado is majestic. Finally, one can’t mention the word “aurora” without mentioning the Aurora Borealis, which is also one of the beautiful natural phenomena in the world. With Aurora, I wanted to write a piece that showed my gratitude to these composers, as if I was a student of theirs and align that with the beauty of Colorado. I had the honor of being commissioned by Weston Sprott, trombonist of the Metropolitan Opera, to write this piece (I am forever grateful to you, good sir). Several years later, I was inspired after talking to my great friend Leo Eguchi to revisit this composition. I knew I could paint a better picture of the story I wanted to tell (no pun intended). I made a cadenza specifically for Leo, embracing great memories of his senior recital. Then I had the inspiration to make a version for Esther Williams on English Horn. Now, I have decided to make versions for a multitude of instruments. As I did my other chamber piece such as Boanerges and The Vivid Dawn, I thoroughly enjoyed revising and recomposing this piece. I believe that Aurora though difficult, will be a rewarding experience for the player. Musically Yours, Chad "Sir Wick" Hughes

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First Suite for Solo Violoncello
  • First Suite for Solo Violoncello

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My love for the cello suites came in September of 1995. As I came home (to the dorms) from marching band practice at the University of Michigan, I heard not only a glorious euphonium sound, but I heard this beautiful melody in C coming from the dorm's practice rooms. I had to find out who and what it was. As I knocked on the door, I introduced myself and then met Matthew Summers, a fellow music major (now currently in the President's Own Marine Band. A week or two later, we went to the library so I could get my own copy of the music.

Coincedently I had just met Leo Eguchi and Minitria Slade who were violoncello performance majors. They had a sound that was just quite mesmerizing. I would ask them questions repeatedly so I could learn how to write for this instrument. I had no idea about bowings, double-stops, bow techniques. I was a kid in a candy store.

Years later, the tuba/euph studio at UM had to learn various movements from the cello suites. I went to the library to grab some recordings. Somehow someway, the video of Mstislav Rostropovich performing the Suites was already playing in the library. He quickly became my favorite cellist. Maybe it was the quality of his CDs. His tone just captured me. The musicality of his cello suites got me hooked on his first note. Forever a fan!

Right around the time I was about to graduate, I ran into our cello professor, Anthony Elliott. He kindly asked me to write him a piece. I was floored. No professor had ever asked me that. Honestly, I was nervous. I hadn't really written solo music before, mostly orchestra music. Unbeknownst to me, Prof. Elliott was putting together a concert and CD of African-American compositions. I just used Bach as my mode and listened over and over to Rostropovich. I didn't write six movements as he did, but decided to use the dance forms.

Musically Yours, Chad "Sir Wick" Hughes

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Aurora, Sonata No. 1 for Viola
  • Aurora, Sonata No. 1 for Viola

Range:

In cart Not available Out of stock
$15.00

Impressionism. That is the name given to the style of wonderful artists as Claude Monet, Édouard Manet, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, and Berthe Morisot and composers as Claude Debussy, Maurice Ravel, and Erik Satie. Monet’s painting “Impression, Sunrise” would give the name to this movement. Debussy and Ravel hated this term, while Satie preferred Dadaism; however, it has been analogous with their music for over a century. These composers have been a major influence in my compositional life. Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun and Deux Arabesques have stuck with me since hearing them. Satie’s Gymnopedie harmonic texture makes me smile every time I hear it. It’s rhythmically not challenging, but yet such an inspiring composition. Around my senior year in college, I went to the University of Michigan University Symphony Orchestra concert of Ravel’s Daphnis et Chloe Suite 2. This was the first time I heard an orchestra piece by Ravel. I was mesmerized. The trade of the flutes and clarinets in the beginning with the violas and cellos underneath was one of the most beautiful sounds I had ever heard. I immediately went to the classical music store right off campus and bought Pierre Boulez’s recording of

Claude Monet’s “Impression, Sunrise” Daphnis et Chloe. Let’s just say I’ve bought it three times since! My best friend Dr. Earl Brooks and I drove from Denver/Aurora to Aspen. This route on I-70 has to be one of the most beautiful drives in the country. The water from the mountains, the mountains, the ski resorts, the trees, the sunrise/sunset, and the landscape were just breathtaking. It stayed this awesome for the entire three hours. I parallel the painting “Impression, Sunrise” with the word “Aurora.” Aurora means “Dawn” which coincidently is also the sunrise. There are some points in Aurora that are unbelievable, although all of what I have seen in Colorado is majestic. Finally, one can’t mention the word “aurora” without mentioning the Aurora Borealis, which is also one of the beautiful natural phenomena in the world. With Aurora, I wanted to write a piece that showed my gratitude to these composers, as if I was a student of theirs and align that with the beauty of Colorado. I had the honor of being commissioned by Weston Sprott, trombonist of the Metropolitan Opera, to write this piece (I am forever grateful to you, good sir). Several years later, I was inspired after talking to my great friend Leo Eguchi to revisit this composition. I knew I could paint a better picture of the story I wanted to tell (no pun intended). I made a cadenza specifically for Leo, embracing great memories of his senior recital. Then I had the inspiration to make a version for Esther Williams on English Horn. Now, I have decided to make versions for a multitude of instruments. As I did my other chamber piece such as Boanerges and The Vivid Dawn, I thoroughly enjoyed revising and recomposing this piece. I believe that Aurora though difficult, will be a rewarding experience for the player.

Musically Yours, Chad "Sir Wick" Hughes

Read more… close